MILK
... To drink, or not to drink ??
In this intriging expose',
the author freshly
examines the proverbial
'goodness' of
milk.

Milk can be good ... but it
can also be
bad ... and
even dowright
ugly

The author explores each
perspective, and presents
an in-depth review
Have you ever heard of A1 and A2 milk ??

Did you know that
all cow's milk is not the same ??
A2, the original variant, has a proline amino
acid at position 67 in the 209 amino acid
chain of beta-casein

A1, the variant created by a mutation in the
ancestors of the Holstein-Friesian breed,
contains a
histidine amino acid at position 67

The
A1 variant therefore digests differently,
and can generate the 7-amino-acid  peptide
fragment BCM-7
... the devil in the milk
There are different variants of the
beta-casein protein in cow's milk
      The author, Brent Bateman, has just completed his
manuscript, and has sent it off to CreateSpace (subsidiary of
            Amazon Books) .... it is NOW available via


            
Amazon.com books  .... or, more specifically:

 www.amazon.com/MILK-drink-not/dp/0979698723

    Createspace needs a little more time to set things up,
       but an e-book version will soon be available via
            
www.createspace.com/900001456

ISBN: 978-0979698729
Price:  $14.95


Wholesale orders can made from Createspace via:

   www.createspace.com/info/createspacedirect

                     Or from   
Baker & Taylor

AND, it is also available as an Amazon kindle book,
available via
Amazon.com/Kindle, for only $8.95

Brent can be reached by email at brentbateman@hotmail.com

Brent is a genuine nutritionist, having earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in human nutrition at the University of Hawaii,
and then his Masters of Science in international nutrition at
the prestigious Institute of Nutrition at Mahidol University
(INMU) in Thailand

This book is number four in his series
The Nutrition Factor: A
Bold New Perspective
There is much to say about
the ‘good’, and the author
is unbiased in his coverage.

Over the years a great deal
of ‘bad’ has also been
argued, based on, for
example, the vegetarian
and animal rights
perspective, the ‘lactose
intolerance’ issue, the on-
going rBGH controversy,
and links with several
disease conditions.
The author frequently diverges from the central
theme to relate an anecdote or to offer insights to
a better understanding of human nutrition,
including historical and cultural perspectives.

  A central purpose of the book, however, is to
                   expose the
‘ugly’.
The  BCM-7 molecule is a tough little devil, and
is very disruptive

 .... it can attach to the insulin-producing
pancreas beta cells and prompt their
auto-immune destruction, leading to diabetes

 .... it is a strong oxidant, and can oxidize LDL
cholesterol, contributing to the build-up of
plaque in the arteries, or atherosclerosis
  
 .... it is a powerful morphine-like opiate and
can pass through the
blood-brain barrier to
create havoc with normal brain function,
leading to neurological disorders such a
schizophrenia and autism.
The dairy industry has decided that it
does't want to confront the enormous
implications and does not want you to
know about this issue
The various governments and their
regulatory agencies have chosen to ‘bury
their heads in the sand’, claiming that the
BCM-7 hypothesis is not ‘proven’ and that
no risk assessment nor protective action
is warranted.
Consumers and dairy farmers in the U.S., Canada,
and Europe know little, if anything, about this issue.

Ironically, the dairy farmers in New Zealand, where
the research originated, are quietly converting their
herds to A2 producers.
Almost all of the milk sold in the United States is
type A1.
The author suggests that what is at stake is more
than simply the challenge to the dairy industry.  
More relevant is your and my health, and that of
our children, and of generations to come.  And
what about the increasing millions who suffer and
will suffer from diabetes, heart disease, and
neurological disorders.
He proposes that it may not be so much a matter
of what science finally concludes .… although this
is extremely important .… but may be more a
matter of consumer’s knowing the truth, being
protected, and having a choice.
The final part of the treatise is then an overview of
the implications and responsibilities,
and a call for action.